Expert answer:VISA1Q99 Brock University The Flatiron Building &

  

Solved by verified expert:Comparison Essay Please read this entire document before you begin and before you email me with questions! This writing assignment is designed to help you learn different ways to write and think about art. For this assignment you will write a minimum 1000 word comparison (excluding footnotes, bibliography) of two artworks. Topic:a. Alfred Stieglitz, The Flatiron Building, 1903 (19-18), p. 525. b. Georgia O’Keeffe, City Night, 1926 (19-19), p. 527. How to Write a Comparison Essay A comparison is an essay comprised of two aspects: comparing elements (noting the similarities) and contrasting elements (noting the differences) of one work with another. The aim of this exercise is to learn more about each work by looking at them alongside one another, as such this is largely a visual exercise of looking. You will be using the types of observations discussed in modules but applying this specifically to two works of art. Your paper must have a thesis and through comparing and contrasting the two works you will argue (prove) your thesis and reach a conclusion. There are two main approaches to writing a comparison: split or lump. This refers to the organization of your points on each artwork. If you want to compare and contrast a number of elements about each work this is splitting and if you write first of one work and then the other in separate paragraphs you are lumping. You may write either way but make certain that you have about the same number of points or observations for each work. Pay close attention to the organization of your paper, it should make sense and flow naturally back and forth between the works compared. Try to make a logical progression from one point to the next. You will want to examine each work of art closely. Ask yourself questions about the artwork: Why was this work made, for whom, by whom, in what style, what context and when? What is the work about? How does it convey a story, event, or particular meaning? How does the artist use form, colour, space, perspective and line? How is the composition arranged? What is the size and condition of the work, does this convey further meaning? Once you think about these types of questions for each work separately you will need to consider them together. Ask yourself, why is this comparison relevant, what becomes more apparent about the works when you look at them side by side? Consider the visual impact, but also the context of the artworks’ production and reception. Are they of the same style and time period or not, why does this matter, are values and cultural elements similar or different? Do 1VISA 1Q99: Writing Assignment Worth 15% of final mark, due Tuesday, June 4th, 11:30 pm via SAKAI>Assignment these works convey the same message or something different, how is this done, how do you observe this in the works? Begin by making notes on each work and then the comparative/contrasting elements that you can write about for both works. From here begin to compose your essay by creating a thesis. Your thesis is a statement that gives direction to your analysis. Take care to organize, revise and edit your paper. Poor organization and lack of editing will detract from your observations and your grade. Format The paper must be 1000 words typed, double-spaced pages of your writing with the course name, your name, and student number on the first page along with a title. You do not need a separate title page for this assignment but if you use one this does not count towards the page length of this assignment. The length requirement is 1000 words excluding title page and bibliography/works cited. You might find it helpful to take a look on SAKAI>Resources>Written Assignment>Further Reading on Writing a Comparison. Links to websites with helpful information are posted there. If you have access to one of the optional resources for this course read Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing About Art: “Writing a Comparison.” Research You are not required to do a lot of research for this paper–it is meant as a practice of looking, describing and evaluating. Begin by reading about the work in your textbook, if you find that you want to use further secondary sources, your paper must follow the Chicago Manual of Style citation format, MLA or APA. Basic information such as title, artist, date, origin of a work and general factual historical information do NOT need to be cited. You do need to cite information and ideas that you take from the textbook. Please see the links on SAKAI under Written Assignment>How to Cite Sources/Bibliographies, if you need help with citations. You will find citation style guidelines there. All secondary sources used in your writing (books, articles, websites, textbook, videos, etc.) must be cited, failure to do so constitutes academic dishonesty and will result in a grade of zero and possible failure in course. Please remember to CITE the textbook if you take more than general information from it! Due Date & Late Policy Papers are due June 4th by 11:30 pm submitted online (via SAKAI>Assignment). You will find under Assignments “Written Assignment #2,” from there you will be able to upload your paper as an attachment in most file types (.doc, .pdf). Be aware that SAKAI does not recognize MAC pages, please convert your file to .pdf before uploading. If we cannot open your file you will receive a grade of zero for the assignment. Once you have uploaded it you will be able to see the originality report for your paper. You will not be able to make changes once you have submitted your paper. Please do not panic when you view the report, often the material that is highlighted is simply your references, names of artist, or artworks. The penalty for late assignments is 5% per day. Failure to submit your paper on time due to internet difficulties is not a valid reason. Assignments handed in more than 5 days late will not be accepted. Exceptions to the lateness penalty for valid reasons such as illness, etc. will be judged by the instructor ONLY when supported by written documentation such as a medical certificate that are presented within 3 days of your absence.
2VISA 1Q99: Writing Assignment Worth 15% of final mark, due Tuesday, June 4th, 11:30 pm via SAKAI>Assignment A Word about Turnitin.com in Assignment As it is the responsibility of the instructor to track and report plagiarism, we will be utilizing turnitin.com in Assignment on SAKAI. This is an anti-plagiarism tool that screens all assignments against a database of the internet, e-journals, e-books, and a range of other scanned material including other assignments and papers for courses at universities. This ensures that all assignments are graded on a level playing field and means the papers can be read for ideas and content rather than policed for plagiarism. If you should have concerns about the use of this anti-plagiarism tool these must be expressed to me via email before May 10th. Grading Your assignment will be number graded out of 15 with comments online and your numerical grade recorded under SAKAI>Gradebook. Please be aware because of the large number of students in this course it may take up to 1-2 weeks for your assignment grade to appear. Helpful Information: • Titles of artworks are italicized, dates follow in brackets i.e. Masaccio’s Holy Trinity (1425) is a fresco depicting the Madonna and child enthroned. • artists are referred to by full name initially and then subsequently by surname only • Avoid the use of colloquialisms and contractions in your essay (i.e. I’m, don’t, isn’t, it’s) • ‘its’ is a possessive form, ‘it’s’ is a contraction for it is • You may use the first person or chose to write from the third person perspective. For example: Immediately I noticed the use of saturated colour in the lower portion of the painting which gives a sense of ground and weight to the composition. OR: The use of saturated colour in the lower portion of the painting gives a sense of ground and weight to the composition. • Footnote or use MLA citations for all secondary material. Include a bibliography or works cited page. • You do not need to include images unless you refer to additional artworks. • If you use quotations (which should be used sparingly and ONLY when they support your thesis directly) cite them correctly and introduce them with your own text. For example: The bold use of Christian symbolism in combination with references to popular culture underscore what art critic Barbara Rose has named as “the religious mundane or popular icon.”1 • Paragraphs need a minimum of three sentences. • Edit your paper for errors, sometimes reading your paper out loud will help catch small errors
writing_assignment__2_guidelines_spring_2019.pdf

visa_1q99_history_of_western_art.docx

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Expert answer:VISA1Q99 Brock University The Flatiron Building &
Just from $10/Page
Order Essay

Unformatted Attachment Preview

VISA 1Q99: Writing Assignment
Worth 15% of final mark, due Tuesday, June 4th, 11:30 pm via SAKAI>Assignment
Comparison Essay
Please read this entire document before you begin and before you email me with questions!
This writing assignment is designed to help you learn different ways to write and think about art.
For this assignment you will write a minimum 1000 word comparison (excluding footnotes,
bibliography) of two artworks.
You may choose one of the following pairs for this exercise:
1. a. Harriet Hosmer, Zenobia in Chains, 1859 (18-6), p. 481.
b. Edmonia Lewis, Forever Free, 1867 (18-24), p. 494.
2. a. Alfred Stieglitz, The Flatiron Building, 1903 (19-18), p. 525.
b. Georgia O’Keeffe, City Night, 1926 (19-19), p. 527.
3. a. Antonio Canova, Cupid and Psyche, 1787-1793 (17-12), p. 458.
b. John Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781 (17-13), p. 459.
4. a. Frans Hals, Isaac Massa and Beatrix van der Laen, c. 1622 (14-21), p. 388
b. John Singleton Copley, Thomas Mifflin and Sarah Morris (Mr. and Mrs. Mifflin), 1773
(17-1), p. 446.
How to Write a Comparison Essay
A comparison is an essay comprised of two aspects: comparing elements (noting the
similarities) and contrasting elements (noting the differences) of one work with another. The aim
of this exercise is to learn more about each work by looking at them alongside one another, as
such this is largely a visual exercise of looking. You will be using the types of observations
discussed in modules but applying this specifically to two works of art. Your paper must have a
thesis and through comparing and contrasting the two works you will argue (prove) your thesis
and reach a conclusion.
There are two main approaches to writing a comparison: split or lump. This refers to the
organization of your points on each artwork. If you want to compare and contrast a number of
elements about each work this is splitting and if you write first of one work and then the other in
separate paragraphs you are lumping. You may write either way but make certain that you have
about the same number of points or observations for each work. Pay close attention to the
organization of your paper, it should make sense and flow naturally back and forth between the
works compared. Try to make a logical progression from one point to the next.
You will want to examine each work of art closely. Ask yourself questions about the artwork:
Why was this work made, for whom, by whom, in what style, what context and when? What is
the work about? How does it convey a story, event, or particular meaning? How does the artist
use form, colour, space, perspective and line? How is the composition arranged? What is the
size and condition of the work, does this convey further meaning?
Once you think about these types of questions for each work separately you will need to
consider them together. Ask yourself, why is this comparison relevant, what becomes more
apparent about the works when you look at them side by side? Consider the visual impact, but
also the context of the artworks’ production and reception. Are they of the same style and time
period or not, why does this matter, are values and cultural elements similar or different? Do
1
VISA 1Q99: Writing Assignment
Worth 15% of final mark, due Tuesday, June 4th, 11:30 pm via SAKAI>Assignment
these works convey the same message or something different, how is this done, how do you
observe this in the works?
Begin by making notes on each work and then the comparative/contrasting elements that you
can write about for both works. From here begin to compose your essay by creating a thesis.
Your thesis is a statement that gives direction to your analysis. Take care to organize, revise and
edit your paper. Poor organization and lack of editing will detract from your observations and
your grade.
Format
The paper must be 1000 words typed, double-spaced pages of your writing with the course
name, your name, and student number on the first page along with a title. You do not need a
separate title page for this assignment but if you use one this does not count towards the page
length of this assignment. The length requirement is 1000 words excluding title page and
bibliography/works cited. You might find it helpful to take a look on SAKAI>Resources>Written
Assignment>Further Reading on Writing a Comparison. Links to websites with helpful
information are posted there. If you have access to one of the optional resources for this course
read Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing About Art: “Writing a Comparison.”
Research
You are not required to do a lot of research for this paper–it is meant as a practice of looking,
describing and evaluating. Begin by reading about the work in your textbook, if you find that you
want to use further secondary sources, your paper must follow the Chicago Manual of Style
citation format, MLA or APA. Basic information such as title, artist, date, origin of a work and
general factual historical information do NOT need to be cited. You do need to cite information
and ideas that you take from the textbook. Please see the links on SAKAI under Written
Assignment>How to Cite Sources/Bibliographies, if you need help with citations. You will find
citation style guidelines there. All secondary sources used in your writing (books, articles,
websites, textbook, videos, etc.) must be cited, failure to do so constitutes academic dishonesty
and will result in a grade of zero and possible failure in course. Please remember to CITE the
textbook if you take more than general information from it!
Due Date & Late Policy
Papers are due June 4th by 11:30 pm submitted online (via SAKAI>Assignment). You will find
under Assignments “Written Assignment #2,” from there you will be able to upload your paper as
an attachment in most file types (.doc, .pdf). Be aware that SAKAI does not recognize MAC
pages, please convert your file to .pdf before uploading. If we cannot open your file you will
receive a grade of zero for the assignment. Once you have uploaded it you will be able to see
the originality report for your paper. You will not be able to make changes once you have
submitted your paper. Please do not panic when you view the report, often the material that is
highlighted is simply your references, names of artist, or artworks.
The penalty for late assignments is 5% per day. Failure to submit your paper on time due to
internet difficulties is not a valid reason. Assignments handed in more than 5 days late will not
be accepted. Exceptions to the lateness penalty for valid reasons such as illness, etc. will be
judged by the instructor ONLY when supported by written documentation such as a medical
certificate that are presented within 3 days of your absence.
2
VISA 1Q99: Writing Assignment
Worth 15% of final mark, due Tuesday, June 4th, 11:30 pm via SAKAI>Assignment
A Word about Turnitin.com in Assignment
As it is the responsibility of the instructor to track and report plagiarism, we will be utilizing
turnitin.com in Assignment on SAKAI. This is an anti-plagiarism tool that screens all
assignments against a database of the internet, e-journals, e-books, and a range of other
scanned material including other assignments and papers for courses at universities. This
ensures that all assignments are graded on a level playing field and means the papers can be
read for ideas and content rather than policed for plagiarism. If you should have concerns about
the use of this anti-plagiarism tool these must be expressed to me via email before May 10th.
Grading
Your assignment will be number graded out of 15 with comments online and your numerical
grade recorded under SAKAI>Gradebook. Please be aware because of the large number of
students in this course it may take up to 1-2 weeks for your assignment grade to appear.
Helpful Information:
• Titles of artworks are italicized, dates follow in brackets i.e. Masaccio’s Holy Trinity (1425) is a
fresco depicting the Madonna and child enthroned.
• artists are referred to by full name initially and then subsequently by surname only
• Avoid the use of colloquialisms and contractions in your essay (i.e. I’m, don’t, isn’t, it’s)
• ‘its’ is a possessive form, ‘it’s’ is a contraction for it is
• You may use the first person or chose to write from the third person perspective. For
example: Immediately I noticed the use of saturated colour in the lower portion of the painting
which gives a sense of ground and weight to the composition. OR: The use of saturated
colour in the lower portion of the painting gives a sense of ground and weight to the
composition.
• Footnote or use MLA citations for all secondary material. Include a bibliography or works cited
page.
• You do not need to include images unless you refer to additional artworks.
• If you use quotations (which should be used sparingly and ONLY when they support your
thesis directly) cite them correctly and introduce them with your own text. For example: The
bold use of Christian symbolism in combination with references to popular culture underscore
what art critic Barbara Rose has named as “the religious mundane or popular icon.”1
• Paragraphs need a minimum of three sentences.
• Edit your paper for errors, sometimes reading your paper out loud will help catch small errors.
1
Author, Source (Place: Publisher, Date) page number. (For Book)
Author, “Article.” Journal Name Volume/Number (Month/Season Year): page number. (For Article)
3
VISA 1Q99 History of Western
Art
Module 9: European and American Art, 1715-1840
Topic: European and American
Art, 1715-1840
Module Overview
This week we will be looking at developments in painting and
printmaking through the 18th century. We will follow developments in
French painting through different styles and investigate the
philosophical notion of the sublime in art.
Readings
Readings: Stokstad, Chapter 17, pp. 447-462; 464-473.
E-Textbook: European and American Art 1715-1840: Introduction,
17.1-17.4 & Summary
Learning Outcomes
By the end of this module you should be able to:
1.
1. Identify the key characteristics of the Rococo style.
2. Explain the style and intellectual origins of
Neoclassicism.
3. Explain the style and dramatic subjects of Romanticism.
4. Consider shifts in terms of subject matter and patrons,
the interest in contemporary events and the art market.
Europe and and American Art, 1715-1840
Rococo
Ornate and playful, Rococo art is often viewed as a reaction against the grand
theatrical manner of Baroque Art that is identified with the formality and rigidity of late
17th and early 18th century court life in France. Rococo is characterized by pastel
colours, delicately curving forms, dainty figures, light-heartedness, and fanciful
architectural decoration. The term Rococo derives from the French word “rocaille”
referring to the small stones and shells that decorate the interior of antique-inspired
grottos, artificial caves made in the landscaped gardens of the time.
This style began in French architectural decoration at the end of Louis XIV’s reign
and quickly spread across Europe. Many artists were inspired by the sensual
colours and style of Rubens’ paintings. Typical of this style is the use the glitter of
silver and gold, reflective mirrors, sculpted ornamentation and themes taken from
Classical love stories replete with figures of putti and cupids. This type of painting
and architecture provided an elegant backdrop for Parisian entertainments, also
called salons, often hosted by accomplished, educated women of the upper classes
(including Louis XV’s mistress Madame de Pompadour). Such salons valued a
developed sense of wit, irony, gossip along with a healthy dose of sexual intrigue
and an almost obsessive sensuality. This is a clear departure from the more serious
church and state commissions of Baroque patronage!
Jean-Antoine Watteau, The Pilgrimage to Cythera, 1717. Oil on Canvas, 1.3 x
1.9 m (17-3)
Watteau was born in Flanders spent his professional life in France. Much of his
style follows the painterly tradition of Rubens, building up forms through the
application of colour. He was the leading interior decorator of the time with Royal
Academy membership, and one of first Rococo painters in the academy. This
painting was the work that he had submitted for admission to French Academy, in
order for this work to be judged a new category needed to be created as it did not fit
within traditional categories of history, portraiture, genre, landscape or still life
painting. The category was designated the “fête galante,” French for an elegant
outdoor entertainment.
The painting depicts a dreamworld in which beautifully dressed couples are posed in
a lush, imaginary park. In antiquity, Cythera, one of the Greek islands, was thought
to have a serious claim to be the birthplace of Aphrodite, the goddess of love. The
island became sacred to Aphrodite and love, a sculpture of the goddess on the far
left eludes to this connection. Several 17th century operas were based on the
island’s claim and the painting may have been inspired by them.
Watteau’s painting is an allegory of courtship and falling in love. The first couple is
sitting absorbed in flirtatious conversation. They are next to a second pair who are
just standing up, while a third pair are heading for a ship below. The young woman is
looking back in nostalgia at the place where she has spent so many happy hours. In
the distance, a number of figures are climbing aboard a superb ship with cherubs
hovering overhead.
There is a highly rhythmical structure of the painting, from the subtle sense of
continuity between the groups of figures, to the vibrancy of the brushstrokes, and the
beautiful colors. Without doubt, the mysterious hazy landscape in the distance is
one of the most innovative features of the painting, a softer, more moody
atmospheric perspective. The lush landscape is not invested in being real, so there
is no need for detailed articulation of leaves or grass, it appears as a painted
theatrical backdrop that echoes the sensuality of the encounters.
Nature is depicted as idyllic here. There is no dirt or rain to compromise the beauty
of the clothes or elegance of the couples. In this painting we can understand why
the Rococo is sometimes referred to as a type of eroticized Baroque, the moment
chosen and the devices of the painting are used to underscore the meaning. In
Baroque painting this would be to inspire faith, here it is to suggest sensuality.
Take a closer look at the iconography of this painting:
Jean-Honoré Fragonard, The Meeting, from The Progress of Love, 17711773. Oil on canvas. 3.18 m x 2.15m (17-4)
Watteau died from tuberculosis while still in his thirties but left many followers that
emulated his style including Jean-Honoré Fragonard. Fragonard was the favorite
painter of the mistress of Louis XV, Madame du Barry. She commissioned the
series of 4 large scale paintings, of which this is one, for a garden house or type of
pleasure pavilion on her estate. Fragonard was primarily a painter for private
patrons surrounding the French court.
This type of painting was typically used to decorate the spaces of aristocracy. It
reflects the gaiety of their social gatherings and the trappings of luxury and
leisure. Notice how the lacy ruffles of female figure’s dress echo the frilly patterns of
the leaves and fluffy clouds, there is a soft and frothy feel to the forms. The setting
is lush, fresh, and fertile, nature is full to overflowing. The female figure on the left
gives a cautionary gesture toward a young man who is climbing up a ladder over the
wall. He pauses as if in mid-step and both look towards the left as if aware of
someone approaching who might be an unwelcome guest in what appears to be the
rendez-vous of an illicit affair.
Take a look at the theatrical lighting in the background and highlighting the two
figures. The lovers are bathed in an almost unnatural radiance more typical of stage
lighting than outdoor gardens, and the woman’s gestures could easily have been
derived directly from the theatre. The thrust of her hand against the greenery is
mirrored in countless prints of the period depicting dancers or actresses directing the
audience’s attention to the wings. The facial expressions and body postures of the
figures are very explicit, we know exactly what is happening from the signals they
convey.
Detail, Statue of Venus and Cupid
Notice the classical elements in the garden, in Rococo paintings these features often
provide comment on the scene. In the centre of the work we see a classical stature
of Venus and Cupid, two figures we recognize as associated with love and
sensuality, but take a closer look as there is a subtle tension between the actions of
the couple and the sculpture. Venus is shown withholding Cupid’s quiver of arrows,
this was a motif Watteau had used in a slightly different version in at least two of his
paintings, and Fragonard would have known those paintings. In Watteau’s
paintings, however, Venus is playful and smiling, here she is appears rough and
menacing, almost knocking Cupid off of the cloud they share. Instead of a happy
union between mother and son, the two bodies are angled dramatically away from
one another. It appears that Cupid has used his arrows to incite love and desire
here and Venus caught him in the act. The trees in the background seem to pull
away from Venus and Cupid matching the angles formed by her body and
Cupid’s. There is a cautionary air about this sculpture even as the two bodies of the
lovers below lean towards each other.
The painting did not make it into the space it was intended for as Madame du Barry
rejected the works once she saw them completed. At the time the French state was
under attack for its extravagances and many see this rejection as an end to this
sensual, indulgent, carefree style of the Rococo to make way for more serious
painting. Other scholars have commented that the figures in the paintings may have
looked too much like Louis XV and his mistress to be understood as simply fanciful
depictions of love and courtship.
England
William Hogarth, The Marriage Contract, from Marriage à-la-mode , 174345. Oil on canvas, 69.9 x 90.8cm (17-5)
In the 18th century there was a growing middle class forming a new market for genre
scenes in England. These paintings were influenced by Dutch painting of everyday
scenes, and like the Protestant paintings these ones often carried moral messages.
Hogarth was best known for his witty, biting commentary on the manners and habits
of the middle and aspiring classes. Contemporary social conventions were often his
subjects, but at heart he was committed to improving society by mocking its ills. The
result here is a kind of moralized genre painting combining the detail of Dutch
painting with the elegance of Rococo.
This work is from a series of six paintings called Marriage à-la-mode which poked
fun at the hypocritical commitments within the marriage contract. This is the first
scene of the series which depicts Lord Squanderfield (notice the judgment leveled
through the name)on the far right, a fictional character, pointing to his family tree
amidst arranging the marriage of his son to a daughter of a wealthy
merchant. Through such an arranged union the merchant enjoys a boost into
aristocracy while the Lord gains the money needed to finish his estate seen through
window over his shoulder.
Sitting back to back on the far left are the couple in question. The young man gazes
at his reflection in the mirror, while the woman enjoys the attentions of the lawyer
who leans in to whisper to her. Notice the two dogs, chained together in the bottom
left corner, typically a symbol of faithfulness but now perhaps symbolizing the
loveless marriage. The young couple is clearly not interested in each other, this
financial union will prove disastrous in the following five p …
Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more

Order your essay today and save 30% with the discount code ESSAYSHELP