Expert answer:The Story of Stuff Mining and Solid Waste Discussi

  

Solved by verified expert:Mining and Solid Wastehello i need help with two discussion questions and two replies to my friends discussions just like the one we did beforehere are the questions 1. After watching Annie Leonard’s Story of Stuff, ponder how humans got to the point where we are so trapped in the process of Take-Make-Waste. What are the impacts on people within this process? How can people break this model and shift toward the economic model of Borrow-Use-Return? How can we keep money flowing through our economic system without continually extracting new raw materials?2. A very smart friend of mine recently said that the best land investment one could make is to buy up old landfills. He says we will, in the not too distant future, be excavating landfills to extract the incredible amounts of metals, glass, and energy resources that are buried in them. What might be some of the possible risks and benefits of such an “investment”?sources:Annie Leonard’s Story of Stuff,https://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-stuff/Overview of Ideas Solid Waste Management found in attached PDF fileand here are two of my friends discussions aslo found in attached PDF files :friend1friend2
overview_of_ideas__solid_waste_management.pdf

freind1.pdf

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Expert answer:The Story of Stuff Mining and Solid Waste Discussi
Just from $10/Page
Order Essay

friend2.pdf

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Consider that the vast majority of the waste produced in from mining, industrial
and agricultural processes, (isnʼt it interesting that that is also where most of our
water goes!), and that municipal waste is just a fraction of that. Of course our
daily behaviors can have an impact on that municipal waste fraction, but our
purchasing choices can also impact the industrial and agricultural sectors by
supporting producers that minimize their waste generation by using recycled
materials in their products and processes. Waste auditors estimate that 75-90% of
what we throw away could actually be reused, recycled, or composted.
Most waste goes to either landfills or incinerators. (Most countries donʼt dump too
much garbage into the ocean… anymore.) Study the figure in chapter 16 to see
how a landfill is constructed with its various impermeable layers, liners, and cells.
Landfills must minimize the amount of liquid that seeps out of the landfill through
the percolation of rain and the liquids that are thrown away. Those liquids must be
collected and sent to a wastewater treatment plant to ensure that the toxic
substances in that “leachate” does not contaminate surface or groundwater
supplies. Some landfills are also equipped with methane collection systems.
Methane is produced through the partial decomposition of the organic materials in
a landfill under low-oxygen conditions. This methane can be directed to an
electric power station where the methane is burned to turn generators. These
waste-to-energy processes are becoming more common and economically
feasible.
Incinerators are more common in areas where land prices are high. Incinerators
burn the trash—and sometimes have waste-to-energy production processes built
in as well. They can have a serious impact on air quality in the region, however.
Dioxins, while heavily regulated, are some of the more serious air pollutants from
incinerators, which arise from the burning of plastics, bleached paper, and various
other commonly thrown away items.
Most non-plastic organic materials can be composted, though. Food waste,
paper, cardboard, landscape waste, and bio-based plastics can be transformed
into rich compost to enhance soil fertility and organic content. As we saw in the
week on agricultural systems, healthy soil is essential for adequate food
production. Composting is an effective way to nurture good soils!
Many paper products can and should be recycled first, though (before being
reduced to compost). Depending on the quality of the fibers in the paper, it can
be recycled numerous times before the fibers are so degraded and shortened as
to not hold together well. Of course, reusing and recycling paper reduces the
need to convert forests into paper.
The same is true of petroleum-based plastics. Plastics are made from oil—either
petroleum or plant-based oils. Most plastics can be reused over and over and
over, and they degrade in landfills terribly slowly—taking hundreds or maybe even
thousands of years to disappear. (We donʼt actually know because plastics have
only been around for less than a century!)
Metals are also quite valuable in recycling markets—so much so that some
valuable metals are often stripped from vacant and abandoned buildings. It is
clear to the metals industry that melting down and reforming existing metals is
much more cost-effective than mining new ore, which then has to go through
incredibly expensive and energy intensive processes to smelt and purify. Glass
and ceramics can be ground up and added to street surfaces, concrete, and other
building materials. Glass can also be melted down and reshaped.
Of course, our e-waste is a relatively new phenomenon that we are only recently
beginning to deal with more responsibly. E-Waste collection centers receive all
sorts of electronics—anything with a cord or a battery, usually—and disassemble
the items to separate the various types of metals while containing the toxic
components. Coltan is a mineral mined in the Congo in Africa that is an essential
material in the components of our electronics. These mining operations lead to
deforestation, loss of habitat for many important species (including gorillas!) and
the exploitation of local populations of people, all of which argue for the need to
capture and reuse those valuable metals from pre-existing electronics.
Mining
The impacts of our waste disposal practices are reason enough to consider
alternatives to throwing things away such as reusing and recycling. However,
getting a grasp on the impact of mining on the environment should be the biggest
motivator to reduce, reuse and recycle. Our economy continually produces “stuff”
that we need to buy, and most of that “stuff” gets thrown away. In most cases the
materials to produce all of that stuff comes from raw sources—freshly mined
metals, quarried rocks, cut forests, and drilled oil. Most of our “stuff” could be
made out of pre-existing materials—i.e., “recycled materials”.
Mining, whether it is surface mining–strip mining or open pit mining—or
subsurface mining, has huge impacts on the surface ecosystems and surface and
groundwater systems in the region where the mine is in operation. Surface mining
involves scraping off the vegetation (and its associated animal communities) on
the surface to dig out the rock layers beneath. The water used in the various
mining and purification processes is usually quite toxic, and often impacts local
streams. While restoration of those ecosystems is now required, restoration
processes are difficult, expensive and usually lead to much more simplified
communities that now live on the tops of toxic mining tailings. Check out this
short movie trailer for The Last Mountain, which was a Sundance Film Festival
winner last year. It will provide some quick images into how mountaintop removal
for coal (a form of “strip mining”) is impacting water, ecosystems and
people. http://thelastmountainmovie.com/video/
In short, mining in all its forms is destructive to the earth and to the people who
live in the region of the mine (even if it provides jobs). Humans have extracted
enough raw materials from the surface of the earth to reuse and recycle over and
over again without much need to ever extract any more—if only we would just get
better at recapturing those reusable metal resources and switching to other
renewable resources for energy.
After watching Annie Leonard’s Story of Stuff, ponder how humans got to the
point where we are so trapped in the process of Take-Make-Waste. What are the
impacts on people within this process? How can people break this model and shift
toward the economic model of Borrow-Use-Return? How can we keep money
flowing through our economic system without continually extracting new raw
materials?
answer 1. : The impacts on people in this process are the decreasing amounts of
material there will be to use while this process keeps moving forward. The
materials are used, made, and then thrown away and never used again. We can
break this model mainly by reusing and recycling the materials after their initial
uses. We can keep money flowing through the economic system without
continually extracting raw materials by selling reused materials and recycled
material.
——————————————————————————————————————
A very smart friend of mine recently said that the best land investment one could
make is to buy up old landfills. He says we will, in the not too distant future, be
excavating landfills to extract the incredible amounts of metals, glass, and energy
resources that are buried in them. What might be some of the possible risks and
benefits of such an “investment”?
answer 2.: Most of the risks of a landfill come from the gases that are found in
them such as ammonia, sulfide, methane, and carbon dioxide. These gases can be
dangerous, especially combined. Many of the benefits come from what your friend
said in terms of the reusable material found in them such as plastic and glass.
They can truly be a benefit in the coming years with the amount of raw materials
decreasing in our world.
After watching Annie Leonard’s Story of Stuff, ponder how humans got to the
point where we are so trapped in the process of Take-Make-Waste. What are the
impacts on people within this process? How can people break this model and shift
toward the economic model of Borrow-Use-Return? How can we keep money
flowing through our economic system without continually extracting new raw
materials?
answer 1. : Impacts of the Take-Make-Waste process are that, it is the major cause
of the pollution of water, air and soil. The death rate increases due to this. It has a
greater impact on the lives of the children. Because of the air pollution, weather
patterns also changed. This also causes many diseases like heart disease and
respiratory function imbalance. People should move towards the economic model
by realizing the value of the used products. However, material would be saved by
adopting the approach of recycling. Innovative techniques should be introduced
for making of products to reuse them. The renewable material should be provided
for production, eliminate the wastage of material, extend the life of product by
repairing techniques, share the information related to product to the customers
and give product as a service like product lease.
——————————————————————————————————————
A very smart friend of mine recently said that the best land investment one could
make is to buy up old landfills. He says we will, in the not too distant future, be
excavating landfills to extract the incredible amounts of metals, glass, and energy
resources that are buried in them. What might be some of the possible risks and
benefits of such an “investment”?
answer 2- : This investment might somewhere benefits by having the precious
metals and fuel found by digging it. If the demand for the precious metals is high
then it would be the greater benefit, because these metals are expensive. Most of
the landfills material can be recycled and some landfills can be mined for the
energy projects, energy from waste. Though, the information related to old
landfills is not available, that what type of waste was there in the landfills. So, the
risk involved in buying the old landfills is that, precious metals might not be
present there and you waste the money by buying it.

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more

Order your essay today and save 30% with the discount code ESSAYSHELP