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Solved by verified expert:Teachers who use the SIOP Model effectively plan, write, and teach their lessons while connecting them to the standards and accommodating for different ELP levels.After reading the “SIOP Teaching Case Study,” record each of the SIOP components and at least two features from each component on the “SIOP Teaching Model” worksheet.The features for each component include: Lesson Preparation: Content and language objectives, content concepts appropriate for age, supplementary materials used, adaptation of content for all student proficiency levels, meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts with language practice. Building Background: Concepts linked to students’ background experiences, links explicitly made between past learning and new concepts, key vocabulary emphasized. Comprehensible Input: Speech appropriate for students’ proficiency levels, clear explanation of academic tasks, and variety of techniques to make content concepts clear Strategies: Ample opportunities for students to use learning strategies, scaffolding techniques consistently used, a variety of questions or tasks the promote higher‐order thinking. Interaction: Frequent opportunities for interaction and discussion, grouping configurations support language and content objectives, sufficient wait time for student responses, ample opportunity for students to clarify key concepts.
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SIOP Teaching Model – Worksheet
Class Subject:
Class Topic:
Students’ ELP Levels:
Standard:
SIOP Teaching Model
How did the teacher use SIOP Component I: Lesson Preparation in the case study?
How did the teacher use SIOP Component I: Lesson Preparation Features in the case study?
(features: content and language objectives, content concepts appropriate for age, supplementary
materials used, adaptation of content for all student proficiency levels, meaningful activities that
integrate lesson concepts with language practice)
© 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
How did the teacher use SIOP Component II: Building Background in the case study?
How did the teacher use SIOP Component II: Building Background Features in the case study?
(features: concepts linked to students’ background experiences, links explicitly made between past
learning and new concepts, key vocabulary emphasized)
How did the teacher use SIOP Component III: Comprehensible Input in the case study?
How did the teacher use SIOP Component III: Comprehensible Input Features in the case study?
(features: speech appropriate for students’ proficiency levels, clear explanation of academic tasks,
variety of techniques to make content concepts clear)
© 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
How did the teacher use SIOP Component IV: Strategies in the case study?
How did the teacher use SIOP Component IV: Strategies Features in the case study?
(features: ample opportunities for students to use learning strategies, scaffolding techniques
consistently used, a variety of questions or tasks the promote higher-order thinking)
How did the teacher use SIOP Component V: Interaction in the case study?
How did the teacher use SIOP Component V: Interaction Features in the case study?
(features: frequent opportunities for interaction and discussion, grouping configurations support
language and content objectives, sufficient wait time for student responses, ample opportunity for
students to clarify key concepts)
© 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
SIOP SUMMARY – COMPONENT 5: INTERACTION
SIOP Component Five: Interactions (4 features):
• Frequent Opportunities for Interaction and Discussion
• Grouping Configurations Support Language and Content Objectives of the Lesson
• Sufficient Wait Time for Student Responses Consistently Provided
• Ample Opportunity for Students to Clarify Key Concepts in L1
Instructional Purposes for SIOP Component Five: Interaction & Features
• Expert teachers analyze and create grouping structures that promote maximum student
learning.
• Expert teachers select at least two different grouping structures per academic lesson.
• Expert teachers utilize grouping structures that reduce teacher-talk time and increase
student responses.
Grouping Configuration Options

Whole Class
Used when the entire class input is required

Partners
Used to provide opportunities for student practice prior to the completion of
independent tasks

Flexible Small Groups
Used to provide/encourage student cooperation
Teaching Strategies to Use for SIOP Component Five Interaction & Features:

Cooperative Group Strategy – Information Gap
Students form small cooperative groups consisting of 4 to 5 students. The teacher
prepares separate worksheets for each student consisting of only one or two answers to
the teacher-selected questions. Students in the cooperative groups must interact, using
their speaking skills, to discover all of the answers to the questions. This is similar to
putting a puzzle together piece-by-piece. Each student possesses a part of the puzzle.

Cooperative Group Strategy-Jigsaw
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The objective of jigsaw reading is to chunk longer readings into smaller manageable
parts. The teacher assigns a page or portion of the reading to each cooperative group.
Each cooperative group is then considered an expert on that specific page. Each group
then shares their portion of the reading with the entire class.

Cooperative Group Strategy – Numbered Heads
This cooperative group strategy is very similar to jigsaw. The only difference is that each
group is not considered an expert group. Here each group completes one part of the
task or problem.

Cooperative Group Strategy – Four Corners
The teacher, on poster paper, writes one question on each of the four posters, based on
one topic. The poster paper is then displayed, one in each of the four corners of the
class. The class is then divided into four different groups. Each group moves in a clockwise pattern writing answers to the proposed questions in each corner of the classroom.

Cooperative Group Strategy – Three Step Interview
Students work in partners. Each partner answers a teacher-created question based on a
specific topic. At the end of three minutes, each pair of partners joins another pair and
shares their answers. This practices oral language development.

Cooperative Group Strategy – Writing Headlines
This activity increases the ability of students to summarize. Here, students form groups
of four or five. Students then create a headline for a set of pictures, short story, event or
video.

Cooperative Group Strategy-Send a Problem
The teacher creates duplicate sets of problems or questions. Students form groups of 4
or 5. Each student group has a partner group. When each group completes the set of
problems or questions, they pass it to their partner group to be checked.
Teaching Material to Use with SIOP Component Five: Interaction & Features

SIOP Wait Time Buttons
The teacher creates three different circular buttons and distributes one packet to each
student. Throughout the lesson, the teacher asks the students if they are ready to
proceed to the next problem, step or sequence. Students place their hand on top of the
button that answers the teacher questions. The buttons read: I’m ready, I’m almost
ready, and I’m not ready.
© 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
SIOP Teaching Case Study
Background Information
Mr. Brown is a fifth grade math teacher in the Phoenix Unified School District. His sheltered instruction
classroom contains 15 ELL students. The students in this classroom are of varying English proficiency
levels (EPLs). Ms. Garcia is Mr. Brown’s teaching assistant in this classroom. The primary native
language for Mr. Brown’s classroom is Spanish. Ms. Garcia is a bilingual teacher who speaks Spanish and
English. The lesson below is a one-hour math lesson on the topic of multiplicative comparisons.
SIOP Lesson Case Study
Mr. Brown enters his fifth grade math classroom on Monday morning to instruct the SIOP lesson which
he has planned. All of his students are seated and paying attention as he opens his lesson. Mr. Brown
displays the content and language objective on the board in a PowerPoint slide. He then asks, “Can
anyone read our content objective for today?” Charlie responds to Mr. Brown’s request by raising his
hand and saying, “I can.” Charlie then reads the lesson’s content objective aloud stating, “Students will
be able to solve multiplicative comparisons.”
Next Mr. Brown points to the words multiplicative and comparisons contained within the PowerPoint
content objective and ask students to repeat these terms chorally. Mr. Brown then asks another
student, Jesse, to read the language objective to the class. Jesse responds by reading, “Students w ill be
able to read, write, and solve multiplicative comparisons using a visual model.” The teacher turns to his
class and asks, “What does the word compare mean?” Maria raises her hand and after Mr. Brown calls
her name to answer the proposed question, she says, “Compare means to talk about similar things.”
Affirming her answer by shaking his head yes, Mr. Brown says, “Yes, and we will talk about how that
works in multiplication.”
Mr. Brown has selected a picture book, How Full is Your Bucket?, to read to his class. This early
childhood picture book depicts an elementary school student who receives drops in his personal bucket
when good things happen to him. Mr. Brown creates a math problem centered on the story’s theme
and says to his class, “Felix realizes that by the end of reading class he had four times as many drops in
his bucket as he had at breakfast. If he had five drops in his bucket at breakfast, how many drops were
in his bucket at the end of reading class?” Angel, a student in class responded to Mr. Brown’s question
by saying, “Felix had 20 drops in his bucket because 5 x 4 = 20.” The teacher explains to his class that
they will now discuss this process in math class. Mr. Brown tells the class that multiplicative
comparisons are those that we see in real life, just as Felix did with the drops in his bucket. He next asks
students in groups of four in their cooperative groups to develop and write the definition of
© 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
multiplicative comparisons in their math notebooks. The teacher does not proceed until each student
has the correct definition of this term recorded in their individual notebooks.
Next Mr. Brown explains the concept, multiplicative comparisons, by stating that it shows a product
through a comparison of factors. On the next Power Point slide Mr. Brown shows a picture of seven
squares in five rows similar to the one below (Figure 1):
As Mr. Brown points to the squares moving across the top row he asks his students to count the
number of squares aloud, and they say, “One, two, three, four, five, six, seven.” Then he tells the class,
there are five rows, let’s count them, the class responds with, “One, two, three, four, five.” Mr. Brown
explains that 7 x 5 = 35 and 5 X 7 = 35. He states that here are exactly 35 squares in his picture!
The next step in the teaching process is for students to create their own diagrams to deve lop an
understanding of multiplicative comparisons but first Mr. Brown models a problem solution on the
white board. The math question on the white board reads, “What is three times as many as five?”
Together, the class will build a diagram to find the answer. Mr. Brown states that they must draw
vertical lines to represent the factors. Mr. Brown turns to his class and says “Draw a vertical line in the
air.” His class responds by doing so. Next Mr. Brown asks his students to draw a horizontal line in t he
air, checking for understanding, and the student do so. Finally, Mr. Brown says, “With your arms show
me an intersection,” and the class crosses their arms in front of their bodies. After checking for
vocabulary understanding Mr. Brown returns to the lesson at hand. The class identifies 3 as the first
factor and as Mr. Brown draws 3 vertical lines on the class white board, so too the students draw 3
vertical lines on their individual white boards.
Figure 2
Next Mr. Brown identifies the second factor as 5 and models adding 5 horizontal lines to the figure as his
students to the same.
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Figure 3
In the next step Mr. Brown tells his class that in order to find the answer to the equation all they need to
do is count the number of line intersections. Mr. Brown then labels the number of line intersections on
the figure. He then tells the students to chorally count out the number of intersections in the figure on
the white board. They proceed by counting one, two…fifteen. Each student then labels their own white
board in the same manner and counts out the fifteen line intersections to their elbow partner. The math
equation for this problem then becomes 3 x 5 = 15.
Figure 4
Finally Mr. Brown requires the students to collectively complete the following math statement based on
the concepts taught above:
_____________ is ________________ times as many as ___________________
Mr. Brown asks his students to write this math problem on their individual white boards and solve the
problem. After students have completed this problem, the teacher asks for a volunteer to write the
answers on the white board for the class. Jenny tells Mr. Brown, “I can do it” and confidently completes
the math problem while saying aloud, “15 is 5 times as many as 3.” Mr. Brown then positively affirms
her answer and asks the class, “Did all of you get the same answer.” The class quickly responds with
“yes” spoken chorally to their teacher! The teacher then states that of course we can also say, “15 is 3
times as many as 5.” Students shake their heads in agreement.
Mr. Brown then instructs the students to solve a problem together at their table groups, using their
individual white boards and markers. The problem for the day is written on the white board in front of
the class and Mr. Brown reads the problem to the class, “What product is 7 times more than 4?” Each
member of the class is now required to draw a visual representation of this problem and also write the
answer down in two ways. Mr. Brown walks around the classroom as the students work individually on
this problem. Once the class has corrected solved this math problem Mr. Brown prepares the class for
another similar math problem. Here, Ms. Garcia distributes one piece of paper per four students that
© 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
are sitting in a cooperative group. That paper provides another math problem, only this time each
group of four students has a different problem. The teacher sets a timer and the students are given
seven minutes to solve their groups’ math problem. When the timer goes off each group passes their
problem clockwise to the next group without the answer. This continues until all groups have
performed all four problems. At this point Mr. Brown writes the answers to all four problems on the
white board and requires that the students check their answers and figures for accuracy.
At the end of class Mr. Brown then reviews the content and language objectives with the class asking
them, “Were we successful in achieving these objectives?” He asks students to give him a thumbs up if
they were successful and a thumbs down if they were not.
Finally, Ms. Garcia distributes a homework worksheet with four similar types of problems for students to
complete at home and bring back to school the next day.
© 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

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