Expert answer:Developing Human Service Leaders Case Study

  

Solved by verified expert:PLEASE REFERENCE THE BOOK I HAVE INCLUDED IN THE ATTACHMENT. THE WORK CITED IS Harley-McClaskey, D. (2017). Developing human service leaders. Thousand Oaks, CA; Sage.In Unit 4, you continued the Riverbend City scenario, leading a task force and managing team conflict. In this assignment, you will reflect on that experience. Consider the following questions in your reflection, and refer to the helpful links in Resources as needed:What are the qualities of an effective team leader? How does the literature support the importance of these qualities?How does a team work together effectively? What are some examples of effective and ineffective teamwork?What are some strategies for success supported by the literature?What were the ethical and diversity issues on the task force?What impact did these issues have on the functioning of the task force?What conflicts arose on the task force?What are strategies that could help in resolution of the conflicts?RequirementsFont: Use 12-point Times or Times New Roman, double-spaced type.Writing: Writing should be clear, organized, and free of errors; it should also follow professional standards.Research: Use at least 3 academic sources to support your work.Length: Your paper should be 4–5 pages, not including cover or reference pages.Format: Follow all current edition APA style and format requirements.
team_functioning_and_conflict_scoring_guide.pdf

riverbend_city__task_force_decision_making_transcript.pdf

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Expert answer:Developing Human Service Leaders Case Study
Just from $10/Page
Order Essay

capella__developing_human_service_leaders3.pdf

capella__developing_human_service_leaders2.pdf

capella__developing_human_service_leaders_pg_149_150.pdf

Unformatted Attachment Preview

6/2/2019
Team Functioning and Conflict Scoring Guide
Team Functioning and Conflict Scoring Guide
Due Date: Unit 5
Percentage of Course Grade: 20%.
CRITERIA
NON-PERFORMANCE
BASIC
PROFICIENT
Describe the qualities of an
effective team leader.
20%
Does not describe the
qualities of an effective team
leader.
Identifies some qualities of an
effective team leader.
Describes the qualities of an Describes the qualities of an
effective team leader.
effective team leader and
suggests criteria for evaluating
their presence in individuals.
Explain how a team works
together, using examples
and suggesting strategies
for success.
20%
Does not explain how a team
works together.
Explains how a team works
together but does not use
examples or suggest strategies
for success.
Explains how a team works
together, using examples
and suggesting strategies
for success.
Explains how a team works
together, using examples and
suggesting strategies for success
supported by scholarly literature.
Analyze ethical and diversity Does not analyze ethical and
issues on a task force.
diversity issues on a task
20%
force.
Identifies ethical and diversity
issues on a task force.
Analyzes ethical and
diversity issues on a task
force.
Analyzes ethical and diversity
issues on a task force and
assesses their impact or potential
impact on the scenario.
Assess team conflicts,
suggesting strategies for
resolution.
20%
Does not assess team
conflicts, suggesting
strategies for resolution.
Describes team conflicts but
does not suggest strategies for
resolution.
Assesses team conflicts,
suggesting strategies for
resolution.
Assesses team conflicts,
suggesting strategies for
resolution and evaluating the pros
and cons of various strategies.
Communicate in a manner
that is scholarly,
professional, and respectful
of the diversity, dignity, and
integrity of others,
consistent with expectations
for human services
professionals.
20%
Does not communicate in a
manner that is scholarly,
professional, and respectful
of the diversity, dignity, and
integrity of others consistent
with expectations for human
services professionals.
Inconsistently communicates in
a manner that is scholarly,
professional, and respectful of
the diversity, dignity, and
integrity of others. Falls short of
meeting the expectations for
human services professionals.
Communicates in a manner
that is scholarly,
professional, and respectful
of the diversity, dignity, and
integrity of others consistent
with the expectations for
human services
professionals.
Clearly, consistently, and
concisely communicates in a
manner that is scholarly,
professional, and respectful of the
diversity, dignity, and integrity of
others consistent with
expectations for human services
professionals.
https://courseroomc.capella.edu/bbcswebdav/institution/HMSV/HMSV8002/190100/Scoring_Guides/u05a1_scoring_guide.html
DISTINGUISHED
1/1
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
Riverbend City ® Activity
Task Force Decision Making
Introduction
Scene 1
Scene 2
Scene 3
Credits
Introduction
You recently helped the Ruby Lake Teen Homelessness Task Force choose a leader.
The task force members were unable to agree on any of the choices—so they’ve
chosen you! You happily accept their offer. So, congratulations—you’re the new leader
of the Ruby Lake Teen Homelessness Task Force.
Today, the task force is addressing a specific case. Eva Wesley is a homeless 16-year-old who was
hospitalized after an opioid overdose. She’s transgender and does not want to return to her
home. The task force has been asked to recommend a course of action for Eva. You will help
guide their discussion.
As you think about how to help Eva, you should ask yourself this: What more does the task force
need to know to better assist homeless teenagers like Eva?
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
1/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
Scene 1
Email from Elizabeth Fine
From: Elizabeth Fine, Guidance Counselor
Subject: Action needed to help homeless teen
I’m so excited that you’re going to be leading the Ruby Lake Teen Homelessness Task Force!
I know this is short notice, but can you stop by later today to help us with an issue that’s come
up? Here’s what’s going on: a 16-year-old homeless girl from Ruby Lake was hospitalized after
overdosing on opioids. She’s transgender. I know this girl; I was her guidance counselor when she
attended Ruby Lake High School.
The county is unclear on how to respond to this situation. The girl adamantly does not want to go
home. The task force has been asked to come up with a recommendation. My guess is that task
force members will have different opinions on this, so we will very much need your guidance!
In addition to help with this particular case, I think this needs to be a stepping off point for
discussing how to assist teenagers like this one. We may need to do some research, and also
think about adding an additional task force member or two to help address this (and other)
issues.
If possible, can you stop by the hospital and speak with the girl, if she’s willing?
Thank you so much for your help!
— Elizabeth
Scene 2
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
2/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
Ruby Lake Office
You stop by Riverbend City Medical Center and meet with Eva Wesley, the transgender girl who
overdosed on opioids. She is willing to speak with you. You ask her what she wants to do. Does
she want to go home?
Eva Wesley
Age 16
I can’t go home. I just can’t. I mean, I really miss my mom. She accepts me for who I am. But my
dad won’t. He calls me Austin, no matter what I tell him. My mom calls me Eva and lets me dress
the way I want when he’s not around—like, when he was in rehab? But he’s not drinking anymore,
so he’s around all the time now. I feel really guilty about that. I keep wanting my father to start
drinking again so I can be myself. I guess that makes me a pretty terrible person. Especially
because he almost died in a car accident because of his drinking, and I know he really wants to
be sober.
But anyways, I can’t pretend like I’m a boy anymore. I’ve known since I was five that I’m really a
girl. I kept it to myself for a long time because I knew my dad would never be okay with it. I have
two sisters and as far as he’s concerned, I’m his only boy. But it got harder and harder to pretend.
That’s why I started taking pills. I did it the first time when I was twelve and it made me feel
better. But then I finally decided I couldn’t pretend anymore and I came out to my parents. My
dad hit me in the face and told me he would kill me if I ever said that again. He didn’t really
mean that, and he said he was sorry when he calmed down. But he won’t let me be Eva. When I
wear girls’ clothes he punishes me—he takes away my phone, doesn’t let me talk to my friends,
stuff like that. When he gets really mad he calls me stuff like faggot and freak.
If it were up to my mom, I could be Eva. But she’s afraid to tell him that. I’m afraid that if she
does tell him, he’ll start hitting her again. He only hits her when he drinks—but I’m afraid that
he’ll be so mad about this that he’ll hit her even if he’s sober. I don’t want my mom to get hurt
because of me.
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
3/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
So anyways, that’s why I left. So I can be Eva. And so my mom won’t get hurt. It’s been about
three months now. And it’s been rough on the streets. I’m not going to lie. I’ve had to… well, you
know. Do some things to get money? Just a few times. But that made me really sad, so I took a
lot of pills. And that’s how I wound up in here. I’m probably better off dead, to tell you the truth.
Scene 3
Task Force Recommendations
You meet with the Task Force in order to make a recommendation to the county for what to do
about Eva Wesley. Three options are discussed: returning Eva to her home, placing her in foster
care, or emancipating her.
Mark Tucker
Group Home Supervisor
Option One: Should Eva be sent home?
We can’t send Eva home. She’ll run away again. Trust me—I’ve worked with many kids in similar
situations. She’s already made her decision—being on the streets is better than being with a
father who won’t let her be herself. Besides, the dad’s alcoholism is a huge red flag. Why would
we send home a teen with drug problems to an alcoholic parent?
Option Two: Should Eva be sent to foster care?
Well, sure—if we could guarantee that the foster provider was LGBT-friendly. But foster care
doesn’t work like that. Kids are placed in foster care based on age, sex, and sometimes religion.
But they won’t consider gender identity. And it’s hard enough to find foster care for older teens.
So if we send Eva to foster care, we might luck out and send her to a welcoming home. Or, it
could be an even bigger disaster than sending her home—and she’ll run away again.
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
4/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
Option Three: Should Eva be emancipated?
Is there another family member who would be willing to take Eva in? Or a close friend? If that’s
the case, then I might recommend emancipation. Otherwise, I have serious reservations. It’s very
difficult for an emancipated minor to function successfully in society without someone over 18 to
“sponsor” them, so to speak.
Chelsea Jenkins
Crisis Intervention Counselor
Option One: Should Eva be sent home?
I think we need to consider the possibility of sending him home. Her, I mean… I’m sorry. It may
not be a great option, but it’s way better than being on the streets, where it sounds like she’s
already turned to prostitution. That’s absolutely horrible. It sounds like her father isn’t drinking
right now—and that when he’s not drinking, he’s not hitting Eva or her mother. The state would
need to work with the family and monitor things closely. It does sound like Eva won’t be able to
identify as a girl for the time being, but—I mean, quite bluntly, isn’t that better than being on the
streets and being a prostitute? At least I think so…I’ll admit that I feel a little out of my element
here. Maybe we need someone on this task force who can speak with more authority on
situations like this.
Option Two: Should Eva be sent to foster care?
I still think home is the best option—as long as there’s monitoring. But if that’s not possible,
foster care is probably the second best option. I know that there’s a chance that she’d wind up
with a family who doesn’t accept her for being transgender. But again, that’s got to be better
than being on the street, isn’t it? Foster families are trained to take care of kids who come from
difficult situations. The system isn’t perfect, but we do have a system in place to help kids like
Eva.
Option Three: Should Eva be emancipated?
Emancipation is tough. Sixteen-year-olds are not ready to function in society as adults. If they
were, then teen homelessness wouldn’t be such a problem—because those teens would be able
to take care of themselves!
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
5/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
Jason De La Cruz
Foster Care Coordinator, Hennsey County
Option One: Should Eva be sent home?
There are no ideal options here. What we really need are broader systemic changes so a kid like
this doesn’t have to choose between homelessness and the abusive environment she came from.
Because, let me be clear—what was going on in her household was abuse. The physical abuse
may have subsided with the drinking, but the emotional abuse was every day. Punishing a child
for being transgender—and calling her names like faggot—that’s abuse, plain and simple. And
she responded to that abuse by taking opioids, which almost killed her. I don’t know what the
best solution is for Eva. I wish I were more of an expert about this issue. But I do know that we
can’t send her home.
Option Two: Should Eva be sent to foster care?
As a foster care coordinator, I have serious reservations about sending Eva to foster care. She’s
16 years old, which means that she’ll be aging out of the system soon. And the system as a whole
is not well-equipped to help kids who age out. The link between experience in foster care and
homelessness is shocking—about 50 percent of the homeless population in the United States has
spent time in foster care, and up to half of kids who age out of the foster system become
homeless within 18 months. And this kid has already been homeless, so she would be at high
risk.
Option Three: Should Eva be emancipated?
Obviously there are problems with emancipation. However, this might be a case where this lessthan-ideal option is appropriate. We have a situation here where Eva is being forced to live as a
male, even though this is clearly a violation of her deeply held beliefs. The situation has led her
to self-medicate with dangerous drugs, which almost killed her. If she goes home, she’ll be forced
to present as male until she becomes an adult. So maybe it’s time we let her become an adult by
law so that she can make her own decision. This is something I’d like to know more about,
actually. Statistically, what happens to transgender teens when they’re emancipated? That kind of
knowledge would help us make more informed decisions in cases like this one.
Elizabeth Fine
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
6/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
Guidance Counselor
Option One: Should Eva be sent home?
I worked with Eva when she was a student at Ruby Lake High School. I’ve spoken with her mother
a number of times—both before and after Eva ran away. Her mother is absolutely devastated. It’s
clear to me that she loves her daughter very much and is willing to accept Eva for who she is.
She’s also trying to keep her family together. She told me a number of times that if she left Eva’s
father, she was afraid they would all wind up on the streets. So, I guess what I’m trying to say is
that I think home might be the best option, but I’m torn. There’s one loving, committed parent at
home—and that’s got to be better than being on the streets. But on the other hand, this is
obviously not an ideal home for a transgender child, or for a child with a drug problem.
Option Two: Should Eva be sent to foster care?
Based on my experiences with Eva’s mother, I still think she belongs at home. She has a parent at
home who loves her deeply. It’s unlikely that she’ll find that in a foster home. Although to tell you
the truth, I don’t know much at all about the experience of transgender teens in foster care.
Maybe we need more information about this issue? Then we could make more informed
decisions when cases like this arise.
Option Three: Should Eva be emancipated?
A child can only be emancipated by a judge. I don’t know if this would even be an option for Eva.
I know the home she came from is far from ideal, but I don’t think things are bad enough there
for her to qualify for emancipation. Especially since there’s a parent there who does love her very
much. I know her father’s treatment has been awful, but is it harsh enough to warrant
emancipation in a judge’s eyes?
Conclusion
Now that you’ve heard the Task Force’s opinions, what do you think the next step should be?
Are you ready to make a recommendation, or do you need more information first?
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
7/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
Reflection Questions
Do you have enough information to make a
recommendation on the Eva Wesley case? If so, what
should be done? If not, what additional information do
you need before you can make a recommendation?
Your response:
This question has not been answered yet.
What knowledge gaps do you see in this task force that
may impact their ability to help teens like Eva Wesley?
How would you recommend they fill these knowledge
gaps?
Your response:
This question has not been answered yet.
Would you recommend an additional task force
member (or members) to help address issues like this
one? If so, what criteria might you use for selecting
these prospective task force members?
Your response:
This question has not been answered yet.
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
8/9
6/2/2019
Riverbend City: Task Force Decision Making Transcript
If the task force were to conduct a literature review,
what information should they research?
Your response:
This question has not been answered yet.
Credits
Subject Matter Expert:
Pamela Klem
Interactive Design:
Marty Elmer
Interactive Developer:
Dre Allen
Instructional Design:
Judi Gronseth
Media Instructional Design:
Naomi Rockler Gladen
Project Management:
Marc Ashmore, Andrea Thompson
Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/3.0/)
media.capella.edu/CourseMedia/HMSV8002/TaskForceDecisionMaking/transcript.asp
9/9
6/2/2019
Developing Human Service Leaders – Pages 152 – 153
PRINTED
BY: ALLENAK194@GMAIL.COM.
Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may
be reproduced or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.
https://capella.vitalsource.com/#/books/9781483393124/cfi/6/42!/4/2/14/4/10/4@0:100
1/1
6/2/2019
Developing Human Service Leaders – Pages 151 – 152
PRINTED
BY: ALLENAK194@GMAIL.COM.
Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may
be reproduced or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.
https://capella.vitalsource.com/#/books/9781483393124/cfi/6/42!/4/2/14/4/24/12@0:15.2
1/1
6/2/2019
Developing Human Service Leaders – Pages 149 – 150
PRINTED
BY: ALLENAK194@GMAIL.COM.
Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may
be reproduced or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.
https://capella.vitalsource.com/#/books/9781483393124/cfi/6/42!/4/2/4/2@0:0
1/1

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more

Order your essay today and save 30% with the discount code ESSAYSHELP